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Teaching Resources for the March on Washington

Understanding the meaning of the March on Washington

On August 24, people from across the United States, and likely ex pats around the world, will celebrate and honor the 1963 March on Washington. The 50th anniversary of this epic event is an opportunity to talk with the children and youth in your family about the event and what it means to people today.

We've gathered a list of resources you can use to help explain the monumental nature of the 1963 March on Washington to the children and youth in your life.

DC Public Library's March on Washington events (http://dclibrary.org/marchonwashington)

Teaching for Change: Teaching about 1963 in 2013: Civil Rights Movement History Resources
http://www.teachingforchange.org/ask-me-about-1963

Books for Children

  • What Was the March on Washington?
    For ages 8 and up
    On August 28, 1963, more than 200,000 people gathered in Washington, DC, to demand equal rights for all races. It was there that Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech, and it was this peaceful protest that spurred the momentous civil rights laws of the mid-1960s. With black-and-white artwork throughout and sixteen pages of photographs, the March is brought to life!
    Available from Politics & Prose (http://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780448465784)

 

  • The 1963 March on Washington: Speeches and Songs for Civil Right
    For ages 8 and up
    The 1963 march on Washington had many goals and brought together many different people and ideas. The end of segregation in schools and housing and an increase in minimum wage were among the most important topics. More than 250,000 people gathered to listen to speeches and music and to share ideas. Kids will be amazed by the number of people involved, what was accomplished, and why the march on Washington was such a landmark event.
    Available from Politics & Prose (http://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780823962556)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. and the March on Washington
    On August 28, 1963, more than 250,000 people came to the nation's capital. They came by plane, by bus, by car--even on roller-skates--to speak out against segregation and to demand equal rights for everyone. They also came to hear the words of a very special leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. Told with a wonderful immediacy, this book captures the spirit of this landmark day in American history and brings Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech to vivid life for young children.
    Available from Politics & Prose (http://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780448424217)
  • March On!: The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World
    For grades 3 – 7

    From Dr. Martin Luther King's sister, the definitive tribute to the man, the march, and the speech that changed a nation.

    On a hot August day in 1963, hundreds of thousands of people made history when they marched into Washington, D.C., in search of equality. Martin Luther King, Jr., the younger brother of Christine King Farris, was one of them.

    Martin was scheduled to speak to the crowds of people on that day. But before he could stand up and inspire a nation, he had to get down to business. He first had to figure out what to say and how to say it. So he spent all night working on his "I Have a Dream" speech, one that would underscore a landmark moment in civil rights history--the Great March on Washington. This would be one of the first events televised all over the globe. The world would be listening, as one of the greatest orators of our time shared his vision for a new day.

    From the sister of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., comes this moving account of what that day was like for her, and for the man who inspired a crowd--and convinced a nation to let freedom ring.

    London Ladd's beautiful full-color illustrations bring to life the thousands of people from all over the country who came to the nation's capital. They sing, they join hands, they march, and they listen as speaker after speaker inspires social change, culminating in Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

    Available from Teaching for Change (http://bbpbooks.teachingforchange.org/book/9780545035378)